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Manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) is a type of gentle massage which is intended to encourage the natural drainage of the lymph, which carries waste products away from the tissues back toward the heart. The lymph system depends on intrinsic contractions of the smooth muscle cells in the walls of lymph vessels (peristalsis) and the movement of skeletal muscles to propel lymph through the vessels to lymph nodes and then beyond the lymph nodes to the lymph ducts which return lymph to the cardiovascular system. Manual lymph drainage uses a specific amount of pressure (less than 9 ounces per square inch) and rhythmic circular movements to stimulate lymph flow.

History: Manual lymphatic drainage was pioneered by Danish Drs. Emil Vodder and Estrid Vodder in the 1930s for the treatment of chronic sinusitis and other immune disorders. While working on the French Riviera treating patients with chronic colds, the Vodders noticed these patients had swollen lymph nodes. In the 1930s, it was considered taboo to tamper with the lymphatic system due to the medical profession’s poor understanding of this system. The Vodders were not deterred by this and, in 1932, began to study the lymp system, developing careful hand movements to cause lymph movement. In 1936, after four years of research, they introduced this technique in Paris, France. Since then, various variations have emerged based on the original Vodder Technique.

If suffering with cellulite, oedema or to assist a detox program, this light relaxing treatment stimulates the body’s ability to release toxins and fluids. Can be done as a single treatment, but the recommendation is to do a series of 5.

A 15 minute consultation is required prior to your first manual lymphatic drainage to make sure you understand the treatment, to look at your medical history, and to ascertain that this will be the best treatment for you.